11.30.2008

Rome

It is so bizarre to me the way Christians like to use the decline of Rome as a model of what will happen to America. This website is a perfect example.
Bizarre because what happened just prior to the decline of Rome? The country became Christian.

4 comments:

Liz Canaan Roberts said...

it's those damn Christians again!

by the by, just for the record, there are plenty of non-Christians who compare the current state of our country to that of Rome; they just choose to put those last three(the economy, government and the military) first on the list instead. and usually leave off talking about family, education, religion and pleasure-seeking (which i will call Agency), since all of these are, sometimes covertly but ofttimes blantantly affected by an obese government anyhow.

p.s. there were also some early zealous Christians in this country who were bent upon a communal (similar to "law of consecration") type society (dare i say socialist?) but they eventually figured it out.

http://www.aier.org/research/commentaries/819-the-real-meaning-of-thanksgiving-the-triumph-of-capitalism-over-collectivism

ricky said...

wow, that article is such a rigorous academic study in the fall of rome

this line was my favorite:
They live in a fantasy world in which they “must” have cellphones; they “need” their privacy; they “have rights.”

man, the idea of kids having privacy and rights is outrageous, if those romans were like todays kids i'm surprised rome didn't collapse sooner!

marissa paolacci said...

london bridge is falling down

chris almond said...

Thank you for the link liz, i will check it out. if i were in india, i'm sure i would be criticizing hindu's a lot in my blog. i have no particular beef with christianity. and i have no problem with people comparing the decline of rome with the united states, i just find it bizzarre when christians do it, and the things they say, because the most prominent event which happened was the country became christian. So if anything, the had a large increase in christian values, yet still fell, illustrating to me, the decline of rome is not related to a decline in 'values'.